Haiti Reconstruction

Rebuilding Haiti must start from the ground up, with agricultural education

I see information about the Rocket stoves and the TLUD stoves. Which is the most fuel efficient? Which stove would work the best for vetiver grass briquettes? I assume the advantage of the Rocket stoves is the ability to use wood pieces fed through the front of the stove.

Can both stoves be used indoors? Can both stoves be used to heat an oven? I saw the video "Vetiver grass & clean cookstoves importance in Haiti". What type of stove was used?

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Hi Sherry, TLUD stoves are better over all since it not only cooks food, it makes biochar which is an important soil enhancer. 

Rocket stoves use every bit of fuel burning hotter, they also burn fuel that is not as dry once started.  The problem with all cook stoves and baking ovens is fuel.

The most important project I feel Haiti needs is soil erosion.  Not only is the soil being depleted, hurricane devastation kills people. We are trying to develop jobs for Haitians and if we can have Haitians make vetiver grass into pellets. this will stop the charcoal making need.  TLUD stoves are also the cleanest burning and people who cook on them will live longer.

We are now putting all our emphases on vetiver grass pellets in TLUD stoves.  I am praying the testing will turn out good that is happening this month.

I agree with your concern about soil erosion. I was in Haiti in April. We stay at the Children's Lifeline mission and was very impressed with the garden there. I have since contacted Chester Venhiuzen and he led me to you and your website.

I was amazed at the terracing of garden Chester's group made,  but didn't understand the purpose of the grass or what kind it was. Now I am totally in awe of vetiver grass...what a blessing.

Here is a link to our slide presentation with several slides of the garden:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKo9awARptM

Sherry,

A rocket stove is best for sticks and split wood fuel. A TLUD requires small very dry chunks of biomass  (no bigger than ping pong ball size). Briquettes are an in between fuel best burned in a stove designed for them, see:

http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/content/toaster-slot

Any of them can be used to heat an oven, if it's designed properly.

Neither one is good in a closed space. Ventilation is required to remove the combustion products (including a little smoke, especially when starting).

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